Women and Public Policy Program Seminar Series
Why Women Mobilize: Dissecting and Dismantling India’s Political Gender Gap with Soledad Prillaman

Why Women Mobilize: Dissecting and Dismantling India’s Political Gender Gap with Soledad Prillaman

January 23, 2019

In India, there persists a striking gender gap in political participation and representation. This political gender gap persists despite decades of democracy and universal adult suffrage, rapid economic development, and large-scale policies aimed at women's political empowerment. Women's political participation is important not only on normative grounds of inclusion, but because research shows that when women do participate, politics changes. Presenting findings from her book project, Soledad Prillaman evaluates the importance of social networks for women's political empowerment and documents how women who have become active political agents  are received and resisted by traditional political networks.

Soledad Prillaman, Postdoctoral Fellow, Nuffield College, Oxford University

 

Does Group Farming Empower Rural Women? India’s Experience with Bina Agarwal

Does Group Farming Empower Rural Women? India’s Experience with Bina Agarwal

January 23, 2019

Few programs for economically empowering rural women focus primarily on farming—the one occupation in which women have the most experience in largely agrarian economies. Thus, two Indian initiatives–in Telangana and Kerala– stand out. These initiatives are unique because they seek to improve women’s livelihoods within agriculture through an innovative institutional form, namely group farming. In this seminar, Bina Agarwal examines whether pooling land, labor, and capital and cultivating jointly, enables women farmers to overcome resource constraints and outperform individual male farmers in the same regions.

Bina Agarwal, Professor of Development Economics and Environment, University of Manchester; Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor, University of Cambridge

The Mommy Effect: Do Women Anticipate the Employment Effects of Motherhood? with Jessica Pan

The Mommy Effect: Do Women Anticipate the Employment Effects of Motherhood? with Jessica Pan

January 23, 2019
 
After decades of convergence, the gender gap in employment outcomes has recently plateaued in many wealthy countries, despite the fact that women have increased their investment in human capital over this period. In this seminar, Jessica Pan analyzes these two trends using an event-study framework with data from the U.S. and U.K. Her findings provide evidence that women in modern cohorts underestimate the impact of motherhood on their future contributions to the labor market. Upon becoming parents, women adopt more negative views toward female employment and report that parenthood is harder than they expected. Jessica also examines whether young women’s expectations about the future labor supply are correct when they make their key educational decisions. She finds that female high school seniors are increasingly and substantially overestimating the likelihood they will be in the labor market in their thirties, which is a sharp reversal from previous cohorts of women who substantially underestimated their future labor supply. Jessica concludes the seminar by specifying a model of women’s choice of educational investment to reconcile the expectations of motherhood across generations.
 
Jessica Pan, WAPPP Research Fellow; Associate Professor of Economics, National University of Singapore
 
Stereotype Threat and Professional Women’s Engagement: A Global Perspective with Zoe Kinias

Stereotype Threat and Professional Women’s Engagement: A Global Perspective with Zoe Kinias

January 23, 2019

How does women's concern about confirming gender stereotypes (i.e., stereotype threat) predict their engagement in professional leadership contexts? In this seminar, Zoe Kinias shares findings from five studies with global businesswomen. Her findings show how stereotype threat predicts psychological disengagement, how an intervention can buffer against deleterious effects of stereotype threat, and stereotype threat's silver lining--that it motivates attitudes and actions in support of gender balance.

Zoe Kinias, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior, INSEAD; Academic Director, Gender Initiative, INSEAD

What Does it Mean to “Help”? Investigating the Helping Orientations of Men Working in Elite Jobs with Stephanie Creary

What Does it Mean to “Help”? Investigating the Helping Orientations of Men Working in Elite Jobs with Stephanie Creary

January 23, 2019
 
Despite efforts to diversify the ranks of top management across the private and public sectors, women and racial minorities continue to be underrepresented in these leadership positions. In this seminar, Stephanie Creary examines the important role that “helping” plays in the career paths of women and minority leaders in elite jobs and, more specifically, the perspectives and actions of men who hold the majority of these roles. Drawing on findings from an on-going study of Army officers, Stephanie reveals the similarities and differences in officers’ interpretations of what it means to help others at work.
 
Stephanie Creary, Assistant Professor of Management, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
Implicit Stereotypes: Evidence from Teachers’ Gender Bias with Michela Carlana

Implicit Stereotypes: Evidence from Teachers’ Gender Bias with Michela Carlana

January 23, 2019

In this seminar, Michela Carlana analyzes the impact of teachers' gender stereotypes on student achievement. She collects a unique dataset including information on the Gender-Science Implicit Association Test (IAT) of teachers and students' outcomes, such as performance in standardized test scores, track choice, and self-confidence. Michela finds that teachers’ stereotypes induce girls to underperform in math and self-select into less demanding high-schools, following the track recommendation of their teachers. These effects are at least partially driven by a lower self-confidence on own math ability of girls exposed to gender biased teachers.

Michela Carlana, WAPPP Faculty Affiliate; Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

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